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  • AUC and the wider learning context

    Tilburg, 12 December 2012

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    Aan een academicus/academica anno 2015 mogen meer eisen worden gesteld. Ik heb enkele jaren geleden de inhoud van de academische vorming met vier bestanddelen omschreven: 1. het beschikken over intellectuele basisvaardigheden (goed

    kunnen lezen, schrijven en rekenen, vinden van bronnen en verwijzingen, spreekvaardigheid);

    2. het beschikken over ruim voldoende disciplinaire kennis op een bepaald vakgebied;

    3. het vermogen om zelfstandig problemen te kunnen en durven oplossen;

    4. voldoende kennis van een andere vakgebied om de relatieve bijdrage van elke afzonderlijke discipline te ervaren; het over de muur van het eigen vak heen kunnen kijken.

    K. Schuyt, 2011

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    Prof. Dr. Robbert Dijkgraaf,

    Director of Institute for Advanced

    Study, Princeton

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    AUC and the wider learning context

    Mission

    Learning outcomes

    Curriculum • Interdisciplinarity • Scientific Reasoning • Global Knowledge,

    International and Intercultural Competence

    • Civic Knowledge and Community Engagement

    • Research-Based Learning

    AUC community • Extracurricular activities • AUCSA (student

    association) • Residential campus • Who’s in Town lectures • Faculty Meetings

    ‘Recruitment’ AUC community: Faculty, Students • Selective admission • Criteria for faculty recruitment; reflection on LAS! • Criteria of excellence (developed by AUC faculty)

    Liberal Arts and Science tradition

    Tutoring

  • Amsterdam University College

    Excellence and Diversity in a Global City

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    Excellence and Diversity in a Global City • We seek excellence in all that we do and believe that it

    is not only the responsibility of each individual to strive for his or her best, but to create the conditions for the success of others.

    • Diversity is our strength. Different approaches, ideas, and values are integral to the creation of a vibrant and challenging learning environment. Diversity, however, requires tolerance. Tolerance, understanding, and open- mindedness are therefore expected of every member of the AUC community.

    • We believe that a global perspective is central to the success of every student. A global perspective requires active engagement with other individuals, communities, and the world. This engagement is celebrated and valued at AUC.

    Mission

  • Learning outcomes

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    2.3 Learning Outcomes The aim of the AUC programme and the campus experience provided is that AUC graduates acquire knowledge and skills as described below.

    2.3.1 Knowledge Graduates will have achieved: a deep knowledge base in the chosen field of study. This depth is to be found in the understanding of the knowledge domain and in the ability to apply concepts, and not only in the accumulation of facts; knowledge of and the ability to apply the most prominent theories and methodological foundations of the chosen field of study; understanding of the broader context in which the research issues of the chosen field of study are positioned; breadth of knowledge, as demonstrated by a (general) knowledge of the physical and natural world, a (general) knowledge of European and world histories, philosophical traditions, major religions, and cultural life worlds and an understanding of economic forces and political dynamics.

    2.3.2 Academic skills Graduates will have: highly developed cognitive, analytic and problem-solving skills; the capacity for independent critical thought, rational inquiry and self-directed learning; the ability to work, independently and collaboratively, on research projects that require the integration of knowledge with skills in analysis, discovery, problem solving, and communication; mathematical skills relevant to their major; familiarity with the general scientific method; second-language competence; the ability to engage with socio-cultural frameworks and traditions other than their own; the ability to plan work and use time effectively.

    2.3.3 Interdisciplinary skills Graduates will demonstrate interdisciplinary skills, i.e. they will: be able to evaluate which disciplines are involved in the solution of complex issues; be able to assess which research methods are most suitable in a particular situation; be able to integrate the content and research methods from disciplines relevant to a particular situation; be able to defend a well-considered viewpoint covering the relevant disciplines; know which phenomena are being studied in the different disciplines and which research methods and theories are being used.

    2.3.4 Learning skills Graduates will possess the attitude as well as the skills for lifelong learning, i.e. they: know how to obtain and evaluate information; are able to focus on a new knowledge domain, formulate an overview and determine their knowledge gaps.

    2.3.5 Communication skills Graduates will demonstrate excellent communication skills, i.e. they will be able to: express themselves well verbally and at an academic level in writing; present ideas in a clear effective way; communicate knowledge to a public consisting of specialists or laypersons, making use of various modes of communication.

    2.3.6 Engagement at local and global levels Graduates will demonstrate engagement at local and global levels, i.e. they will be able to: use a knowledge of cultures in explaining current problems in society; understand and appreciate cultural differences, not only at a distance, but in real life; live with different value systems in daily life, and reflect on their own value systems; demonstrate an international awareness and openness to the world, based on an understanding and appreciation of social and cultural diversity and respect for individual human rights and dignity.

    2.3.7 Personal and social responsibility Graduates will demonstrate: profound respect for truth and intellectual integrity, and for the ethics of scholarship; intellectual curiosity and creativity, including understanding of the philosophical and methodological bases of research activity; an openness to new ideas and unconventional critiques of received wisdom; leadership skills, including a willingness to engage in constructive public discourse, to accept social and civic responsibilities and to speak out against prejudice, injustice and the abuse of power.

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    AUC aims to educate students to become: • multilingual, • informed and engaged global citizens (‘competent rebels’), • with well-developed intercultural competences, • able to read intelligently, think critically and write

    effectively on the processes shaping our world.

    The aim of the combination of the AUC curriculum and the campus experience provided is that AUC graduates acquire knowledge and skills as described below.

    ‘21st century skills’ and learning outcomes:

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    ‘Recruitment’ AUC community: Faculty, Students • Selective admissions • Criteria for faculty recruitement; reflection on LAS!

    • Criteria of excellence (developed by AUC faculty)

    • Excellence is a reciprocal commitment to demanding academic standards and engagement on the side of the teacher and the student. Students take ownership of their learning process: prepare, participate, interact, and engage in self-reflection Students are encouraged to learn more than expected, think critically, and make connections with what is going on in science and society The teacher is an inspiring source of knowledge and provides guidance to learning The student needs knowledge to develop understanding and to analyse, before being able to discuss a subject critically While focusing on core concepts in their course, teachers relate course subjects to other fields and disciplines The teacher varies the forms of class activities and evaluation

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    Curriculum • Breadth and depth

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    Curriculum • Interdisciplinarity • Scientific Reasoning • Global Knowledge, International and Intercultural Competence • Civic Knowledge and Community Engagement • Research-Based Learning

    Integrating insights from two or more academic disciplines in order to develop a greater understanding of problems that are too complex or wide-ranging to be dealt with using the knowledge and methodology of just one discipline. • Theme courses, Big Question courses • Cross-listed courses (e.g. SCI/SSC); where applicable.

    Please note: we also highly appreciate mono-disciplinary courses! ‘breadth and depth’

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    Curriculum • Interdisciplinarity • Scientific Reasoning • Global Knowledge, International and Intercultural Competence • Civic Knowledge and Community Engagement • Research-Based Learning

    The development of academic thinking and strong analytical skills is an integral part of the curriculum for all students. The curriculum offers ample opportunities for students to focus on science and science-related majors in a liberal education context. Academic Core courses: • Academic English I & II (all) • Logic (all) • Basic Research Methods & Statistics I & II (SSC) • Calculus I, Calculus